Turning a Corner

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It has been a rough week of coding, processing, and de-bugging. But at long last, tonight I’m running the last two scripts I need to run to parse the last of the 330+ Gigabytes of data I received three weeks ago, and I’ve already tested them so I’m pretty confident they’ll work. By tomorrow, if all goes as planned, I’ll have all the data I’m going to be using on this project (a lean 60 GB or so) imported into Stata, where I can slice and dice it however I please. At exactly the halfway point of my residency in Tokyo, this is a major milestone.

The next step is some finer-grained cleaning and de-duplicating of this data, followed by some additional coding to structure it in a useful way (as you can see in the photo, I’ve already started sketching out my file trees). Then I’ll be able to describe and analyze what I’ve built. All of this will take time–the most primitive observation identifier in my data is the individual trademark application number, and it looks like I’ll be dealing with about 4.5 million of them, give or take. And each application number will have multiple records associated with it to capture lots of nitty-gritty trademark-y information like changing ownership and legal representation, renewals, divisional applications, goods and services classifications, foreign and international priority claims, and so on. Processing all that information takes time, and requires a lot of attention to detail. But today I’m feeling good. Today, I feel as confident as I ever have that this project is going to succeed.

So here is a first fruit of my research. The data I’m working with only goes back 15 years, but for any trademark registrations that have still been in force during those past 15 years, I have a fair amount of historical data. The earliest application date I’ve found in the data I’ve imported so far is July 31, 1890. That application– which became Japan Trademark Registration Number 521–is for the mark “重九”, which means literally nothing to me. But I asked around the office, and fortunately I have a colleague from Beijing here in Tokyo, who tells me 重九 is actually a Chinese brand–for cigarettes:

https://i2.wp.com/www.etmoc.com/eWebEditor/2011/2011090515413693.jpg

重九 translates roughly to “double-nine”, and the additional character (which apparently always accompanies the mark in its current use) translates roughly to “big” (i.e., “Big Double-Nine” Cigarettes). The mark was last renewed in Japan on March 28, 2015. Given that I’m here to study international aspects of intellectual property as they pertain to Japan, the fact that the earliest mark on record appears to be foreign is an interesting development.

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